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2nd Annual Art in the Arctic Show

bettyjeff_artshowAre you an artist that supports wildlife conservation? Do you specialize in art that was inspired by Alaska wildlife and the habitats where they live? If so, we encourage you to apply to showcase your work at the 2nd annual Art in the Arctic Art Show on March 4, 2017 at Birch Hill Nordic Center in Fairbanks, Alaska.  This event is hosted by the Friends of Alaska’s National Wildlife Refuges (Friends) volunteer organization.  All proceeds from this show will be used to help fulfill the Friends mission of “promoting the stewardship of Alaska’s unique National Wildlife Refuges through education, support, and advocacy.”

The Art in the Arctic Art Show is a juried exhibition and sale of traditional and contemporary art and fine craft. Artists are selected on the basis of originality, artistic concept, and quality of their work. All work submitted must feature compositions or objects that highlight 1) wildlife, including fish, birds, mammals, insects, reptiles, and/or marine life; 2) natural landscapes or habitats; and/or 3) people living off the land. Acceptable media categories include paintings, sculpture, limited  edition prints, jewelry,  photography, metal work, bone carving, woodcut, basket, bead, fiber arts, pottery, glass,  mixed media, etc. Deadline for electronic applications is January 15, 2017. Hard-copy applications must be postmarked by January 10, 2017. For more information or to apply visit: Art in the Arctic Art Show Information

(Photo: Friends Volunteers Betty Siegel and Jeff Walters greet attendees at the 1st Annual Art in the Arctic Art Show)


 

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Kaktovik Polar Bear Conservation Project – Part 2

Part 2: Field report filed by Jaqueline Keating
(Read Part 1 here)

“Don’t walk out to the truck yet, there’s a polar bear under the porch.”

That’s something you don’t get to say to your roommates very often. But when it’s one o’clock in the morning and the local polar bear patrol needs help nudging bears out of people’s backyards, this is a logical conversation to have when one of those bears has moved under the bunkhouse porch (which has to be traversed in order to reach the truck used to assist with said patrol). It was not long before the bear moved to another location and we were able to get into our vehicle and assist with driving laps around the village in an effort to keep bears away from houses. As exciting as this moment was, at the time it felt like just another day in Kaktovik.

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(photo by Anita Ritenour, 2015) 

I am incredibly fortunate to have worked with Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and Marine Mammal Management staff on the Kaktovik Polar Bear Conservation Project. Thanks to the support of Friends of Alaska National Wildlife Refuges, I was able to spend over three weeks on the Arctic Coast assisting with this vital effort. Duties included partaking in daily bear counts, monitoring bear viewing activity on Arctic Refuge waters, meeting with visitors from around the world to share information about the Arctic Refuge and the challenges facing polar bears, teaching about bears in local schools, and working with the Kaktovik Youth Ambassadors in their effort to share their community with tourists.

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Early into my stay in Kaktovik, we counted 69 polar bears on a single morning count. While bears and people have coexisted in Kaktovik for a long time, a combination of decreasing sea ice and the availability of whale remains from the subsistence hunting that takes place in the fall has yielded a much higher density of bears near the village in recent years than ever before. Simultaneously, this village with less than 300 residents is suddenly seeing upwards of 1,000 people in a six-week time span to see the infamous polar bear. The physical and social climate could hardly be changing more rapidly.

I will soon be defending my Master’s thesis on human-bear interactions on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge on Kodiak Island. My time in Kaktovik reinvigorated my passion for my research, and the importance of understanding the inseparable role that people play in wildlife management. In addition to having the privilege to work with so many talented staff and volunteers in the Fish and Wildlife Service, spending time with the local community was truly a gift. Whether it was running up and down village streets with the kids after school, sitting with elders and listening to their stories, or standing with others on the edge of the village watching bears feed across the glassy Arctic waters, it was a joy to experience this community.

I could not be more thankful for Marine Mammal Management and Refuge staff members who have worked so hard to build positive relationships with such a special community. I am honored to have been able to witness and partake in this project. Thanks again to the Friends of Alaska National Wildlife Refuges for enabling this partnership and many others like it!

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2016 Refuge Week – Celebrations at Arctic, Kanuti, and Yukon Flats Refuges

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by Allyssa Morris, Environmental Education Specialist (USFWS)

National Wildlife Refuge Week reminds Americans how nature enriches our lives and adds to the beauty of our country.  This special week highlights the National Wildlife Refuge System – the network of lands and waters that protect wildlife and their habitats.  This year Arctic, Kanuti, and Yukon Flats Refuges celebrated that connection with the natural world by hosting two events in Fairbanks with the help of the Friends of Alaska Refuges.

Archery Night was held at the Morris Thompson Center on October 11, 2016. The event was geared for youth ages 9+ years old. Trained Service staff and volunteers taught youth proper techniques and skills in an outdoor setting. Inside the main lobby there was an array of activities such as owl pellet dissections, pelts and skulls, and the opportunity to make a nature-inspired rubber stamp card. Visitors were also able to warm up with a cup of hot cocoa. Friends of Alaska Refuges member Dave greeted visitors at the entrance and member Joseph grilled hotdogs. It was a brisk and cold evening full of activities and smiling faces.

The second event was Refuge Day at the Fairbanks Children’s Museum. This event was geared for youth ages toddler to 8 years old. Attendees were able to make a squishy sensory fish pouch, play an animal matching game and even receive a blue goose removable tattoo.  The highlight of the event was meeting Puddles the Blue Goose, who received many hugs throughout the event. Friends member Jeff handed out juice boxes and cookies and Friends member Sarah led a craft on making blue goose clothespin magnets. This was a fun day to learn and celebrate the refuges!

  
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Friends Member Dave Personius greets visitors at the Morris Thompson Center at Archery Night

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The Cotter Family dissects owl pellets and learns about food chains with Botanist Janet Jorgenson

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Betty Morris, age 2, demonstrates how big a polar bear can be

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Refuge Day at the Children’s Museum:
Puddles with Children’s Museum Staff;  Friends members Jeff Walters and Sarah Mathews hand out cookies and juice to attendees.

 

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2016 October Membership Meeting

Reminder: Friends’ Membership meeting is Tuesday, October 18th. Please call in a few minutes before 5pm, 866-556-2149, code 8169747# Our presenter will be Tim Plucinski, FWS contaminant specialist for the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge. His presentation, “Attu 2016, Steps Towards Island Restoration,” is a photo narrative of the U.S. Army Corps Engineer’s recent efforts to cleanup two contaminated sites on Attu Island, Alaska. Tim’s primary focus has been to work with the various Department of Defense agencies responsible for the addressing legacy contamination on the Refuge following World War II and the Cold War.  His presentation is available here: Watch KTVA’s report here.
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Kaktovik Polar Bear Conservation Project – Part 1

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Part 1: Field report filed by Jaqueline Keating

The Kaktovik Polar Bear Conservation Project is a collaboration between the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Marine Mammal Management Program to address increases in polar bear concentrations and visitor use around the native village of Kaktovik.
Friends is sponsoring  Jacqueline Keating to volunteer for  three weeks, assisting with daily bear counts, visitor education, and school outreach. She is completing graduate work on managing bear viewing on the Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge and is really thankful for the opportunity to experience a different type of bear viewing management.

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Read Part 2 here!
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Arctic Village Science and Culture Camp Goonzhii

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Friends Volunteer Brenda Dolma had the opportunity to work with youth, refuge staff, and community elders of Arctic Village, during their annual Science and Culture Camp.  Camp Goonzhii (meaning “wisdom and knowledge” in Gwich’in) took place in late August 2016.  Thirty youths ranging from kindergarten through twelfth grade participated. The Science and Culture Camp includes curriculum in western science and traditional ecological knowledge, combined with indoor and outdoor learning experiences through demonstrations and hands on environmental education activities. Community elders share their wisdom about the land and animals, while Refuge staff offer exposure to new technologies.   Some camp topics and activities included:
  • Migratory birds
  • Animal tracking and drawing
  • Archery
  • Dog sled construction
  • Skin sewing
  • Caribou butchering and processing
  • Blueberry picking
  • Plant identification
dolma2I had the opportunity to meet Sarah James [community elder and Friends member], who has been speaking to protect the habitat for the future.   It was a treat to get out on the field trips and experience the beauty of Arctic Village in fall,” says Brenda.

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  To learn more about the Camp, check out this article by News Miner, in Fairbanks. The Friends of Alaska National Wildlife Refuges provided funding for nightly community dinners and Brenda’s travel. Membership comes with the chance to Volunteer. Check out our current opportunities.
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Friends Atigun Gorge Float in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

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(Photos by Lione Clare)

Board Friends, past and present, joined current and prospective Fairbanks members and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff to float several miles into the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge via the Atigun River from the Dalton Highway. The outing,proposed by National Wildlife Refuge Association (NWRA) Director David Houghton, had a two-fold mission:
  1. Reward members for long-time Board service, and
  2. Recruit and engage Fairbanks individuals as active Friends members
This intrepid and diverse group of 14 met in Fairbanks on July 15, 2016 and ventured up the Dalton Highway in a van and several pick-ups, first stopping at the Hot Spot Cafe for the establishment’s notably huge burgers, and then touring the Arctic Interagency Visitor Center in Coldfoot. After a night camping at Marion Creek, the group drove on to the Atigun River, where they inflated rafts and prepared for the three hour boating journey.  

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The following photos exemplify some of the beautiful scenery and exciting moments experienced, as well as the challenges of enduring mosquitos, rain, and an arduous hike back to the road the next day.

Everyone felt this event achieved its goals in every way, as the camaraderie and shared experience reinvigorated the Board, past and present, while Fairbanks members brought new ideas and commitment to the Friends organization. A huge thank you goes to NWRA and the Wilburforce Foundation for encouraging and funding the trip, and to Steve Berendzen and Barry Whitehill of Fairbanks for planning and coordinating logistics and equipment for the float.

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#Hiking in ANWR. @lioneclarephotography

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2016 September Membership Meeting

Reminder: Friends’ Membership meeting is Tuesday, September 20th. Please call in a few minutes before 5pm, 866-556-2149, code 8169747# Our presenter, Stephanie Brady, FWS, is presenting an overview of the Non-Subsistence Take of Wildlife Final Rule and discuss the implications for specific refuges. She will also be giving an update on the Izembek National Wildlife Refuge court decision. Her presentation is available here:
We’ll also share recent and future volunteer opportunities/events and introduce draft bylaws changes to the membership along with available board positions and other Friends news.
* For those in Homer, join us at Islands and Ocean Visitor Center, in the upstairs conference room. Come a little earlier since the doors are locked by 5pm.
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Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge 75th Anniversary Celebration

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Friends Vice President Henri Balland and member Tom Balland traveled from Homer to Kodiak to help with the Refuge’s 75th Anniversary Celebration.  Friends members worked directly with Kodiak Outreach Specialist Lisa Hupp, to help pull off an awesome event. friendsgroup75th Saturday, August 20th, was packed with a community BBQ, guest speakers, live marimba music, photo booth, exhibits, face painting, appearances of “Puddles the Blue Goose” and “Kodiak the Bear”, and a celebratory cake for the more than 500 people in attendance.   Henri and Tom contributed volunteer time, helping with set-up, clean-up, running errands, and greeting staff, volunteers, and a few Refuge System VIPs, Cynthia Martinez, Chief of the National Wildlife Refuge System and Mitch Ellis, Alaska Chief of Refuges. They also hosted the Friends Outreach Table, where they met and familiarized community members about the Refuge and the Friends organization.  

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Learn more about Kodiak National Wildlife Refuge’s 75th Anniversary Celebration!

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